S.E.A. Focus 2022

13 - 23 January 2022
  • Chance Constellations

    Yeo Workshop is pleased to present new works by Sarah Choo Jing, Maryanto and Citra Sasmita at S.E.A Focus 2022. Returning with the theme Chance Constellations, the fourth edition of S.E.A Focus is an exploration of the shared histories, geographies and converging cultures that connect the artistic community in this region. It seeks to reflect how humankind has been dependent on constellations to navigate, orientate and locate our place in the world, and how we choose to align the dots to create images that are born out of our human imagination.

     

    Building on his ongoing research around the pillaging of land in Indonesia, Maryanto investigates the burgeoning exploitation of sand in the area for urban development and global production, at a pace that increasingly exceeds natural renewal. While he reflects on the asymmetrical power relations within this lucrative industry, Citra Sasmita highlights female agency and solidarity in her paintings. She draws on symbols from traditional Balinese culture to reimagine scenes of genesis. Looking closer to home, Sarah Choo Jing brings a composite of hawker centres in Singapore in her new work that invokes the familiar and nostalgic. Alongside the exhibition at Tanjong Pagar Distripark, Quynh Dong will also be showing My Paradise at Projector X: Riverside as part of the S.E.A Focus Official Fringe Programme. A sardonic commentary on the yearning for Eden, the video work features Dong’s parents as protagonists within a dream-like, yet kitschy landscape of Vietnamese idealism.

  • Sarah Choo Jing

    Not from here is a digital composite of hawker centres in Singapore that exudes the theatrical and uncanny, yet remains intimately nostalgic. It recollects a time before the global pandemic, where social interaction was unrestricted. Drawing on archival images of Singapore with her own observations of a socially-distanced city, Sarah Choo Jing reimagines these communal spaces that have now become temporal and transient. Individuals from the ‘present’ captured in a state of contemplation are placed in contrast with those from the past, gathered in groups. Choo reintroduces the artist’s hand in this work, reinterpreting the documentary narratives she has found through assemblage and photo-realistic painting. Upon closer examination, the painterly marks in Not from here raise questions against the reality of the scenes before our eyes.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Sarah Choo Jing is a Singaporean artist known for her interdisciplinary approach to photography, video and installation. Her work depicts identifiable moments and characters within contemporary urban society suggestive of a plethora of private and often solitary narratives. The artist is concerned with the gaze of the flaneur, voyeurism and the uncanny. She was recently awarded the Lumen Art Prize 2021, 3D/Interactive Award and was shortlisted as a Finalist for the Audemars Piguet Commission for Art Basel 2020. Choo has been exhibited internationally at the Turku Art Museum in Helsinki (2019), National Museum of Singapore (2017), and Busan Museum of Art in Korea (2016).

  • Sarah Choo Jing

    Not from here, 2021

    Diasec photography print on lightbox

    180 x 109 cm

    Edition of 5 + 1 AP

  • Maryanto, Umbul Manten Lanang, 2021

     

    Maryanto

    Umbul Manten Lanang, 2021

    Charcoal on paper

    80 x 55 cm

    Maryanto

    Building on his ongoing research around the pillaging of land in Indonesia, Maryanto investigates the burgeoning exploitation of sand in the area. He refects on the growing tensions between traditional miners and corporations, where the latter is accelerating the extent of sand mining in Indonesia towards greater destruction. His evocative, black and white paintings, Miner Bivouac and Kali Boyong, bring to life the asymmetrical power relations that animate around this dangerous but fnancially lucrative industry. In Javanese mythology it is said: Merapi always gives everything as needed and always gives it, so take what is suffcient. Through these works, Maryanto draws on the transnational politics of volcanic sand mining and warns us of the receding boundaries of place-based knowledge, traditional livelihoods, and pastoral ways of life.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Maryanto creates black and white paintings, drawings, and installations that undermine the romantic language of traditional landscape painting to examine socio-political structures in the physical spaces that he depicts. Through fable-like and theatrical settings, these landscapes are subjected to the whims of colonisers and capitalists through technological development, industrialisation, pollution of the land and exploitation of its natural resources. The artist has been exhibited internationally at museums and biennales such as the Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide; the Asia Culture Centre, Gwangju; the Bozar Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels (2017); the Singapore Art Museum, Singapore (2015); and the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, Amsterdam (2013).

  • Maryanto, Umbul Manten Wedok, 2021

    Maryanto

    Umbul Manten Wedok, 2021

    Charcoal on paper

    55 x 80 cm

  • Maryanto, Sand Miner Bivouac, 2021

    Maryanto

    Sand Miner Bivouac, 2021

    Scratching, acrylic on canvas

    200 x 100 cm

  • Maryanto, Kali Boyong, 2021

    Maryanto

    Kali Boyong, 2021

    Scratching, acrylic on canvas

    150 x 200 cm

  • Maryanto, Anthropogenic Linggayoni , 2020

    Maryanto

    Anthropogenic Linggayoni, 2020

    Scratching, acrylic on canvas

    150 x 200 cm

     

  • Citra Sasmita, The Universe, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    The Universe, 2021
    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas

    36 x 40 cm

     

    CITRA SASMITA

    Citra Sasmita continues to draw on elements of traditional Balinese culture and literature to reimagine female narratives in society. Her new body of work deliberately casts women as pioneers through various symbolic representations, where their energy forms the foundation of the universe. Women are depicted to control fire, which signifies agricultural advancements, power and reproduction; while snakes are a reference to knowledge and patriarchy, where knowledge is handed down to their daughters and sisters. The works are done in traditional kamasan style featuring a traditional border used in Hindu scriptures, which has been passed down over five generations. Through these elaborate scenes of genesis that exemplify teamwork and solidarity in sisterhood, Sasmita subverts the typical subordinate position women are designated in history.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Citra Sasmita is a Balinese artist who re-reads the historical canon on how women are positioned within a certain socio-political context, but also indirectly explores the path of art history within the Kitab Kakawin in Javanese Hinduism, which is based on patriarchy. In her works, she traces the marginalised narratives of women in Balinese society and endows her female figures with powerful agency. Notable projects in 2021 include a mural ‘A Place Further than the Universe’ commissioned by IKEA and exhibitions at the MACAN Museum Jakarta and Para-Site Hong Kong. Her works will also be presented at the Kathmandu Triennale later this year

  • Citra Sasmita, The High Priestess, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    The High Priestess, 2021

    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas
    36 x 40 cm

  • Citra Sasmita, The Strength, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    The Strength, 2021

    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas
    36 x 40 cm

  • Citra Sasmita, The Magicians, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    The Magicians, 2021

    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas
    36 x 40 cm

  • Citra Sasmita, The Garden of Hesperides, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    The Garden of Hesperides, 2021

    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas
    144 x 154 cm

  • Citra Sasmita, Land of our Ancestors, 2021

    Citra Sasmita

    Land of our Ancestors, 2021

    Acrylic on Kamasan canvas, brass hanger
    193 x 144 cm

  • Quynh Dong, My Paradise, 2014

     

    Quynh Dong

     

    My Paradise, 2021

    Single-channel video installation

    1920 x 1080 cm, 14:32 min

    Edition of 5 + 2 AP

     

    Quynh Dong

    A sardonic commentary on the yearning for Eden, My Paradise features Quynh Dong’s own parents as protagonists within a dreamlike and kitschy landscape of Vietnamese idealism. She references a myriad of cultural icons, motifs and settings including oriental-styled maquettes of a teahouse, pavilion and half-moon Chinese bridge made by the artist’s father, to reinforce an overblown nostalgia fed by mythic imagery. Within this childlike digitised tableaux, the couple is seemingly self-absorbed: they tend to a garden of enormous fowers; ride fying horses; and gaze in rapture at a rainbow. Unfolding as five chapters in no apparent chronology, the work is the artist’s refection on her parents’ journey to the West in search of a better life. Marrying both traditional and pop imagery with a garish sensibility, Dong satirises the construct of ‘The Orient’ through the times.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Quynh Dong creates hyper-real video works to provide an innate platform upon which she deliberately challenges cultural stereotypes. Based in Zurich, Switzerland, her practice extends to also include performance and sculpture. She studied Fine Arts at Bern University of the Arts and completed her MA in Fine Arts at Zurich University of the Arts. Dong has been exhibited internationally, notably at the Kunsthalle Bern, Galerie Perrotin in Paris, Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten in Amsterdam, and Galerie Bernhard Bischoff & Partner in Bern.

     

     

     

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    QUYNH DONG

    My Paradise, 2021

    Single-channel video installation

    1920 x 1080 cm, 14:32 min

    Edition of 5 + 2 AP